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Dignitaries throughout the country gather in Las Vegas for National Clean Energy Summit

Former Vice President Al Gore takes the stage at the National Clean Energy Summit. (Kyndell Nunley | KSNV)

Dignitaries from throughout the country are here in Las Vegas, gathering for the National Clean Energy Summit.

Hundreds of environmentalists and members of the energy industry filled the ballroom at the Bellagio on Friday to hear from the politicians.

In its ninth year, the summit is focused on highlighting the ways Americans are using -- or can use -- renewable energy.

From extreme flooding to wildfires and pollution, former United States Vice President, Al Gore, spoke out to hundreds Friday about issues scientists have tied to climate change.

“If anybody doubts that we have the political will to accomplish this, just always remember that political will, itself, is a renewable resource,” Gore said during his address.

The former V.P. took the stage as this round’s keynote speaker, focusing not only on how communities respond during times of environmental crisis but during national tragedies like we saw right here in Las Vegas, almost two weeks ago.

“I hope everybody in Las Vegas realizes that you have inspired the world, with the acts of courage and character,” said Gore.

Alongside former Senator Harry Reid, Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval is hosting this year’s daylong summit.

The governor held up our state as a leader in clean energy, pin-pointing Las Vegas as the perfect place to hold the national conference, even when recovering.

“I’m biased, but Las Vegas is the greatest city in the world and I think people and can really feel good about coming here, they can feel really good about living here and raising a family here,” said Gov. Sandoval. “There’s a Nevada that I know, that many of you from out of state have now come to know.”

Just ahead of the start of the summit, the non-profit, Clean Energy Project, announced that jobs tied to renewable energy in Nevada are growing at a rate three times faster than overall employment, statewide.

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