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Resorts facing new reality of increased measures to ensure security

“Screening that occurs without the guests’ knowledge, or with their knowledge, but without them having to be inconvenienced is going to be the key to making this a successful industry long into the future,” says Hooters Director of Security Gil Chavez.

It's just after 10 p.m. last Sunday, and Hooter's Casino Security Supervisor Robert Vogt will never forget it.

“I heard a rapid series of pops in the distance behind me,” Vogt said.

Then he saw what was coming.

“One of the people that was running, you could see terror in their faces,” he said.

Vogt says approximately 600 scared concert-goers were converging on his property, which sits just blocks from the concert venue.

Hooters took in the wounded.

“Forty approximate, 20 with gunshot wounds,” Vogt says, adding, “shortly thereafter we set up a triage area, to make sure the wounded could get rapid response to EMT personnel.”

It's a night Las Vegas hoped it would never see — and a night that changes the game — says security expert Moshe Alon, a former Israeli Secret Service agent who owns a security company in Los Angeles.

“The resorts will have to obviously start screening in some way the luggage, the bags, or the people, all of it together,” Alon says.

RELATED LINK | Strip properties weigh new security measures in wake of Las Vegas mass shooting

That, in order to stop the next Steven Paddock from holing up in a local hotel room.

At Hooters, the director of security says resorts will be beefing up training, weaponry, and screening.

“Screening that occurs without the guests’ knowledge, or with their knowledge, but without them having to be inconvenienced is going to be the key to making this a successful industry long into the future,” says Hooters Director of Security Gil Chavez.

On Fox News Channel on Sunday, Steve Wynn said his resorts already have a counterterrorism program in place.

He says no guest goes undisturbed for more than 12 hours.

After that, security gets involved.

Caesars tells me, "We are constantly reviewing our security policies and practices to keep our guests and employees safe. We are also working very closely with law enforcement."

MGM Resorts Spokesperson, Debra DeShong, also issued the following statement:

"Security has been and continues to be a top priority at all of MGM Resorts. MGM Resorts works consistently with local and national law enforcement, first responder and emergency operations agencies, as well as intelligence services, private security associations, to reassess security across the Company, and all of our properties to keep procedures at our resorts up to date.
As our Security team is working tirelessly to protect the safety of our guests and facilities, MGM Resorts has elevated its level of security to add to the level of comfort and safety of our guests and employees."

Las Vegas always prided itself on privacy. But guests will now get a closer look. That’s good, says Raul Cardona, visiting from Houston.

“I feel perfectly fine with it. If I have nothing to hide, I'm not scared. I feel safer,” he says.

Which, now more than ever, is Las Vegas' most important job.

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