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Rip-Off Alert: You can’t believe everything you hear, even from celebrities

Pro and college basketball star Rumeal Robinson, profiled on CNBC's latest "American Greed," used his fame to mastermind a $700,000 bank fraud. (NBC News)

Checking the latest news on your favorite movie star. Scrolling through a famous athlete's feed. Psychologists call it celebrity worship, and we all do it.

But in some cases, people will believe anything they say, leading to great consequences.

Pro and college basketball star Rumeal Robinson, profiled on CNBC's latest "American Greed," used his fame to mastermind a $700,000 bank fraud. Robinson convinced his loan officer to trust him and even go in on the scam.

“I was a lot star struck at first. I gave it more credibility than I, than I should have,” the loan officer said.

Robinson capitalized on his celebrity to lure others into his scam.

In Robinson's case he was the fraudster, but in some schemes, a scam artist uses a celebrity's name to lure people in.

Be wary of online celebrity product endorsements: lotteries associated with celebrities or emails saying you've won a chance to meet them.

People experiencing change are at more risk of celebrity worship.

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