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Scores of survivors make emotional return to site of Las Vegas mass shooting

A memorial grows Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017, on the Las Vegas Strip after 58 people were killed and hundreds were wounded in the worst mass shooting in U.S. history. (KSNV)

Survivors of the mass shooting on the Las Vegas Strip returned to the scene Wednesday for the first time. Countless others stopped to pay their respects to the 58 people who lost their lives.

James Suarse, who survived the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history, was one of those that returned to the site.

“You know all you can think of is save your ass ... run,” he said. “Your wife is with you get her to safety and the things you had to do and the people you had to step on.

“I mean, I was slipping in blood and stuff you shouldn’t see. We loaded everybody we could in that truck — I have police sirens on my truck and a bunch of lights — and I couldn’t stop until everybody was out of the truck safe.”

On the 32nd floor of Mandalay Bay remains a haunting reminder of where the lone gunman took aim at the crowd of people below.

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The concert grounds remain blocked off as federal agents comb through the scene.

Near the site on Las Vegas Blvd. South, a new memorial grows with flowers, candles and handwritten notes.

“We all just got to get together and right now all of us here showing how much we all care ... the love we all have, that’s all we can do now,” said Bry Thompson, who is friends with several victims.

As for Suarse, he’s offering his company up to repair survivors’ bullet-riddled cars for free. It’s his personal push to stay “Vegas Strong.”

“This is my way of trying to heal and give back,” said Suarse.

Police have indicated personal belongings left on the concert grounds still needs to be processed and cleared before releasing it back to survivors. It’s a process that could take four to five days.


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