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Survivors of 1 October shooting speak out at March for Our Lives

1 October Survivors at March For Our Lives

Thousands of people gathered in Downtown Las Vegas Saturday in the local March for Our Lives. Heard among the crowd were the voices of people all too familiar with the issue: survivors of the 1 October mass shooting.


"I want kids to feel safe at school, I want parents to not worry about sending their kids to school. I want to be able to go grocery shopping and not worry about someone coming and shooting up the grocery store,” said Stephanie Welleck.

Welleck was not able to enjoy the safety she described the night of the Route 91 Festival five months ago. That’s the reason she says she had to march Saturday.

“I didn't want to be here,” she said. “But I have to be here because I was there.”

Saturday's march in Las Vegas was one of more than 800 planned around the world.

RELATED | Hundreds of thousands march for gun control in the US

The calls to end mass shooting, especially on school campuses, were led by the survivors from Parkland, Florida, where a gunman killed 17 people, including students, on Valentine’s Day.

“Schools are now doing drills for an active shooter. How sad is that? How sad is that? It's just not right,” said Jennifer Shebilske, who was also at the festival the night of October 1.

A mass shooting survivor herself, she says she feels connected to the Parkland teens. Now, from across the nation, she’s standing with their calls for change.

"From what I experienced from October first, I just felt like if I would have stood stronger or yelled louder, maybe those babies wouldn't have lost their lives,” Shebilske said.

In Las Vegas, the shooting survivors out Saturday said they want to continue to make noise until the guns that threaten schools, concerts and lives go silent.

Guns, mental illness, whatever it is, make the change, just try,” said Welleck.

"It has to end. There's no reason for bump stocks and AKA’s, it's just not needed and not one more life needs to be lost,” said Shebilske.

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