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Local federal workers ask: when will shutdown end?

A federal furloughed worker overcome with emotion being comforted by Senator Jackie Rosen

You see what the shutdown looks like: checks not getting printed, services not getting delivered, garbage not getting picked up.

Here's what the shutdown feels like: around a table in Las Vegas Friday, at an event organized by Sen. Jacky Rosen, D-Nevada, TSA Supervisor Julia Peters started weeping. Rosen came over, box-of-tissue in hand, offering the federal worker who is not getting paid what comfort she could.

“It's mainly frustration. The tears are for frustration just for what I and all my coworkers are going through,” Peters says.

Around the table were federal government workers missing their first paycheck because this standoff is now approaching its 21st day.

TSA agent Jerome Coleman, who's 61 and a veteran, had to leave the event early. He and his agents still have to report to work, even though they’re missing a paycheck.

“I got to go help take some officers to work because they don't have enough money to take gasoline in their car to get to work,” Coleman says.

In Nevada, there are 3,100 federal workers not getting paid because the dispute is holding up the funding for their agencies.

One the one side stands Trump, who wants his $5.6 billion southern walls, and on the other stand Democrats, who want different security.

“Nobody wants criminals, nobody wants human trafficking. Nobody wants drugs coming across. But there are smart and effective ways to use taxpayer money,” says Sen. Rosen.

Democrats today put on a full court press: Senator Catherine Cortez Masto held the same type of event up in Reno.

In the meantime, federal families here wonder when this will end.

In the Stubitz family, both mom and dad work for the federal government. His agency's been funded. Mom's been furloughed.

“There's just a lot of uncertainty in terms of when we're going to be able to get our bills paid,” says Cris Stubitz, who works for the National Park Service at Lake Mead.

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